Throwback Thursday: Woodstock, Day 3

Throwback Thursday: Woodstock, Day 3

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Brought to you by Blackfire Research….On this day in 1969, the Woodstock Music and Art Fair in upstate New York was scheduled to come to a close. However, due to delays caused by severe weather, the musical acts were forced to halt. (Images of Free Love activists dancing, running, tumbling and sliding in muddy fields due to the heavy rain has become synonymous with the festival.) Jimi Hendrix, who was supposed to close the festival on Sunday night, didn’t begin his set until the following morning at 8:30am. The audience of around 400,000 at the height of the festival dwindled to about only 30,000 by the time Hendrix took the stage Monday. In total, 32 acts performed throughout the weekend, including The Grateful Dead, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Janis Joplin, The Who and Jefferson Airplane. To this day, the legacy of Woodstock lives on, widely viewed as a defining moment for popular music, and the culminating event that defined the counterculture generation.

Throwback Thursday: Allan Sherman releases “Hello Mudda, Hello Fadda”

Throwback Thursday: Allan Sherman releases “Hello Mudda, Hello Fadda”

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On this day in 1963, American comedy writer, Allan Sherman, released his most successful comedic-parody track “Hello Muddah, Hello Fadda,” a novelty song in which a boy describes his disastrous experience at fictional “Camp Granada” to the tune of Ponchielli’s “Dance of the Hours.” The lyrics were based off letters Sherman received from his son, Robert, while he attended camp in upstate New York. The song became a surprise hit, reaching No. 2 on the national charts for three weeks, even winning Sherman a Grammy Award for Comedy in 1964. Although Sherman’s success eventually faded, to this day, “Hello Muddah, Hello Fadda” remains a classic fixture in American pop culture.

   

Throwback Thursday: Madonna Releases Her Debut Album

Throwback Thursday: Madonna Releases Her Debut Album

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On this day in 1983, The Queen of Pop, Madonna, released her self-titled, debut album. Born in Michigan, the pop star moved to New York City to pursue a dance career but began singing in her performance groups. She was eventually signed by Sire Records. Her debut album, “Madonna,” was an upbeat, post-disco sound that used new technology for the time, such as a Moog bass, the Linn drum machine, and the OB-X synthesizer. Five singles were released from the album, including “Holiday” and “Borderline,” which became international top 10 hits. The album set the stage for pop music in the 1980’s, creating an entirely new sound for the coming decade. Madonna’s second album, “Like a Virgin,” released the following year, became her first Number 1 album. Madonna herself would go on to become a global icon: spearheading the rise of music videos on MTV, dictating 1980’s and 1990’s women’s fashion trends, and becoming the best-selling female recording artist of all time. Check out Madonna’s website here: http://www.madonna.com/

 

 

On this Day in Music History: July 20, 1965

On this Day in Music History: July 20, 1965

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Brought to you by Blackfire Research….On this day in 1965, iconic American folk singer, Bob Dylan, released his most influential single “Like a Rolling Stone.” The song is a condensed version of a ten page verse Dylan had written upon returning from a tour in England that left him exhausted. The song was hailed as revolutionary due to it’s cynical stance and the repeated direct address of the question “How does it feel?” “Like a Rolling Stone” was the first song Dylan performed with an electric guitar, which shifted him from niche folk singer to mainstream rock and roller. However, this shift alienated many of his die hard, folk fans. In fact, the first time he performed the song live (a few days after it’s release) he was booed by the audience for using an electric guitar. Rolling Stone Magazine has twice placed the song at Number 1 on it’s list of “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.”

On this Day in Music History: July 13, 1964

On this Day in Music History: July 13, 1964

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Brought to you by Blackfire Research….On this day in 1964, English blues rock band, The Animals, reached number one on the singles charts in the UK with their rendition of “The House of The Rising Sun.” With it’s howling vocals and haunting organ riffs, the song is viewed by many music historians as the first mainstream, folk rock hit. Although The Animals popularized this particular ballad, musicologists have traced its theme and wordage back to a 16th century. The song was eventually brought to the US, where the location changed from England to New Orleans by Southern performers. The oldest published version of the song dates back to 1925, and the oldest known recording is by Appalachian musicians from 1933. Woody Guthrie recorded a version in 1941, and Bob Dylan followed suite 20 years later. But it wasn’t until The Animals’ 1964 version of the song that it became a mainstream hit, and eventually, a rock classic.